Dating statistics snapshot of a boston single

The data shown above come from the Facebook dating app, Are You Interested (AYI), which works like this: Users in search of someone for a date or for sex flip through profiles of other users and, for each one, click either “yes” (I like what I see) or “skip” (show me the next profile).

When the answer is “yes,” the other user is notified and has the opportunity to respond. The graphic shows what percentage of people responded to a “yes,” based on the gender and ethnicity of both parties (the data are only for opposite-sex pairs of people).

“People who leave organized religion are disproportionately male,” Birger says.

“It’s a myth that men enjoy the chase,” Birger says.

Slaving away in p.r., education, nursing, event planning or other female-dominant fields? “Stanford sociologist Michael Rosenfeld reports that 10 percent of Americans meet their future spouses at work,” Birger says.

Better options include Silicon Valley, San Francisco, San Diego and Columbus, Ohio.

The Bay Area, for example, attracts programmers, computer scientists and engineers — fields that are disproportionately male.

They attended colleges that were majority male.” Want to increase your chances of getting hitched?

Head to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (72 percent male) or Georgia Tech (66 percent), two institutions with way more guys than girls.

Perhaps most surprising is that among men, all racial groups preferred another race over their own.

AYI analyzed some 2.4 million heterosexual interactions—meaning every time a user clicked either “yes” or “skip”—to come up with these statistics.

Its users skew older than Tinder’s—about two-thirds of AYI users are older than 35, according to a spokesperson.

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